Is sugar good or evil? The latest research shows that we may very likely be abusing it to the point of being evil. Science now shows that sugar, in its myriad forms, is slowly killing us.

The single largest source of calories for Americans comes from sugar—specifically high fructose corn syrup. These are the trends in sugar consumption for the last 300 years: (Johnson RJ and Gower T. (2009) The Sugar Fix: The High-Fructose Fallout That is Making You Sick and Fat, Pocket, 416 pp)

  • In 1700, the average person consumed about 4 pounds of sugar per year.
  • In 1800, the average person consumed about 18 pounds of sugar per year.
  • In 1900, individual consumption had risen to 90 pounds of sugar per year.
  • In 2009, more than 50 percent of all Americans consume one-half pound of sugar PER DAY—translating to a whopping 180 pounds of sugar per year!

Sugar is loaded into your soft drinks, fruit juices, sports drinks, and hidden in almost all processed foods—from bologna to pretzels to Worcestershire sauce to cheese spread, and even injected into meat. Most infant formula has the sugar equivalent of one can of Coca-Cola, so babies are being metabolically poisoned from day one if taking formula.

Sugar is hidden under many different names. Know those so you can avoid them in P3:

  • Agave syrup
  • Barley malt
  • Beet sugar
  • Brown sugar
  • Buttered syrup
  • Cane juice crystals
  • Cane sugar
  • Caramel
  • Corn syrup
  • Corn syrup solids
  • Confectioner’s sugar
  • Carob syrup
  • Castor sugar
  • Date sugar
  • Demerara sugar
  • Dextran
  • Dextrose
  • Diastatic malt
  • Diatase
  • Ethyl maltol
  • Fructose
  • Fruit juice
  • Fruit juice concentrate
  • Galactose
  • Glucose
  • Glucose solids
  • Golden sugar
  • Golden syrup
  • Grape sugar
  • High-fructose corn syrup
  • Honey
  • Icing sugar
  • Invert sugar
  • Lactose
  • Maltodextrin
  • Maltose
  • Malt syrup
  • Maple syrup
  • Molasses
  • Muscovado sugar
  • Panocha
  • Raw sugar
  • Refiner’s syrup
  • Rice syrup
  • Sorbitol
  • Sorghum syrup
  • Stevia in the Raw (contains sugar)
  • Sucrose
  • Sugar
  • Treacle
  • Turbinado sugar
  • Yellow sugar

What is Starch?

Starch, common name applied to a white, granular or powdery, odorless, tasteless, complex carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)x, abundant in the seeds of cereal plants and in bulbs and tubers. Molecules of starch are made of hundreds or thousands of atoms, corresponding to values of x, as given in the formula above, that range from about 50 to many thousands.

Starch molecules are of two kinds. In the first kind, amylose, which constitutes about 20 percent of ordinary starch, the C6H10O5 groups are arranged in a continuous but curled chain somewhat like a coil of rope; in the second kind, amylopectin, considerable side-branching of the molecule occurs.

Starch is manufactured by green plants during the process of photosynthesis. It forms part of the cell walls in plants, constitutes part of rigid plant fibers, and serves as a kind of energy storage for plants, because its oxidation to carbon dioxide and water releases energy. The granules of starch present in any plant have size, shape, and markings characteristic of the species of plant in which the starch is made.

Starch is almost insoluble in cold water and in alcohol, but with boiling water it gives a colloidal suspension that may form a jelly on cooling. Hot water changes starch slowly into smaller molecules called dextrins (see Dextrin). This reaction, an example of hydrolysis, is catalyzed by acids and by some enzymes. Dextrins, like starch, react with water, giving still simpler molecules, the ultimate products being maltose, C12H22O11, a disaccharide, and glucose, C6H 12O6, a monosaccharide (see Sugar).

Starches are often given names than end in the letters “-an,” such as glycan or mannan. When you read labels and see ingredients you don’t recognize, it is best to assume that any word that ends in “-an” (or “-ans”) is a starch.

In Pounds and Inches, Dr. Simeons says about P3 (3 weeks of no sugar and no starches): “For the following 3 weeks, all foods allowed except starch and sugar in any form (careful with very sweet fruit).” From this we determine that low sugar fruits can cautiously be used during this phase. Below is a list of fruits, sorted by sugar levels. Stick with the lowest and low-medium fruits, tending towards the lowest and the first half of the low-to-medium list.

It is important in Phase 3 to pay attention to how your body responds to foods. Many people who have been overweight a very long time, and are very insulin resistant, may find that fruit makes them gain, especially in the early part of this segment of the protocol. Keep fruit under control, and don’t eat it too much.

Fruits Lowest in Sugar

  • Small Amounts of Lemon or Lime
  • Rhubarb
  • Raspberries
  • Blackberries
  • Cranberries

Fruits Low to Medium in Sugar

  • Strawberries
  • Casaba Melon
  • Papaya
  • Watermelon
  • Peaches
  • Nectarines
  • Blueberries
  • Cantaloupes
  • Honeydew Melons
  • Apples
  • Guavas – Pineapple Guavas (Feijoa) and Strawberry Guavas
  • Apricots
  • Grapefruit

Fruits Fairly High in Sugar

  • Plums
  • Oranges
  • Kiwifruit
  • Pears
  • Pineapple

Fruits Very High in Sugar

  • Tangerines
  • Cherries
  • Grapes
  • Pomegranates
  • Mangoes
  • Figs
  • Bananas
  • Dried Fruit, such as
  • Dates
  • Raisins
  • Dried Apricots
  • Prunes

In Pounds and Inches, Dr. Simeons says about P3 (3 weeks of no sugar and no starches): “For the following 3 weeks, all foods allowed except starch and sugar in any form (careful with very sweet fruit).” From this we determine that low sugar fruits can cautiously be used during this phase. Below is a list of fruits, sorted by sugar levels. Stick with the lowest and low-medium fruits, tending towards the lowest and the first half of the low-to-medium list.

It is important in Phase 3 to pay attention to how your body responds to foods. Many people who have been overweight a very long time, and are very insulin resistant, may find that fruit makes them gain, especially in the early part of this segment of the protocol. Keep fruit under control, and don’t eat it too much.

Fruits Lowest in Sugar

  • Small Amounts of Lemon or Lime
  • Rhubarb
  • Raspberries
  • Blackberries
  • Cranberries

Fruits Low to Medium in Sugar

  • Strawberries
  • Casaba Melon
  • Papaya
  • Watermelon
  • Peaches
  • Nectarines
  • Blueberries
  • Cantaloupes
  • Honeydew Melons
  • Apples
  • Guavas – Pineapple Guavas (Feijoa) and Strawberry Guavas
  • Apricots
  • Grapefruit

Fruits Fairly High in Sugar

  • Plums
  • Oranges
  • Kiwifruit
  • Pears
  • Pineapple

Fruits Very High in Sugar

  • Tangerines
  • Cherries
  • Grapes
  • Pomegranates
  • Mangoes
  • Figs
  • Bananas
  • Dried Fruit, such as
  • Dates
  • Raisins
  • Dried Apricots
  • Prunes